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How to Do a Performance Review with Your Nanny

How to Do a Performance Review with Your Nanny

Performance reviews don’t have to be a stressful time for you or your nanny. If you practice good communications, a review could be as easy to accomplish as a normal conversation. These reviews are necessary in order to provide feedback for your nanny regarding praise and/or faults that need to be discussed.

1. Professionalism

The first thing you need to remember is that this is an employment situation. You are the employer and should show a professional respect for your employee. A performance review should be completed regularly whether there is fault or not. Most employers will offer evaluations every 90 days, so why should you be any different?

2. Privacy

A performance review should always be held in privacy. It is no one’s business aside from your own and your nanny as to how the performance of your employee affects your household. Even privacy from children could be greatly beneficial especially if there are concerns that need to be addressed. While some employees may feel intimidated by private consultations, this quells rumors and falsehoods from developing due to what is discussed from someone overhearing the situation. Your spouse and yourself should sit with the nanny in the living room and discuss the performance review while the child is playing in his or her bedroom.

3. Praising

Every employee likes to hear how good of a job they are performing. It’s not necessarily meant to boost an ego, but people like to be informed if their work is appreciated. Start your performance review by listing the good aspects of the nanny’s work so far. This allows the nanny to feel pride in her work and that you have noticed the good job she has completed. You don’t need to embellish too greatly on the good aspects of the job, but simple acknowledgement can go a long way to encouraging continued success.

4. Negatives

Approach negative aspects of a nanny’s performance rationally and communicate about the complications. If you communicate with your nanny, you could discover that you may have been in the wrong. If your nanny isn’t completing a specific task, maybe she doesn’t know that the task was part of the job description. Find out why the task wasn’t completed and find a common ground as to what is to be expected in the months to come.

5. Encourage Feedback

Not every employer is flawless, although many believe they are. Encourage your nanny to provide you with feedback on your own performance. If there is common ground to be gained, the environment can benefit from further understanding as to how each of you feels. Calmly discussing problems within the relationship can help prevent miscommunications and misunderstandings later on.

6. The Nanny is Not Your Counselor

A performance review should have an air of professionalism. Going into further details of instances within your life begin to wear down the employer/employee relationship. Although you don’t have to be rude by not sharing how your day has gone thus far, you don’t really need to go too far into details pertaining any given situation. You are the nanny’s employer and she shouldn’t be used as a counsellor or sounding board about your private problems.

7. In Print

As you are the employer, part of the professionalism is to have everything in writing. Producing a performance review with your nanny should be no different than if you were the HR department at any retail store. Putting the review in print:

  • Removes miscommunications from both parties
  • Provides the means of which the nanny can study in order to increase efficiency
  • Acts as a reminder as to what had been addressed in previous reviews
  • Is a historical representation of a nanny’s progression for various legal reasons

Performance reviews don’t have to centre around faults. If you choose not to regulate these reviews, at least have a periodic meeting even if the nanny hasn’t done anything wrong. A review with no fault is just as productive as it inspires the nanny to continue doing a good job. Everyone enjoys hearing how the work he or she provides is appreciated and even something as small as a “good job” periodically can improve productivity in any individual.

Alison

Author: Allison Foster. Blogging for was a natural progression for Allison once she graduated from college, as it allowed her to combine her two passions: writing and children. She has enjoyed furthering her writing career with www.nannyclassifieds.com. She can be in touch through e-mail allisonDOTnannyclassifiedsATgmail (symbols taken out to avoid spam).